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Microbial Communication - Research
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Microbial Communication - Research

 
“omics” in the higher basidiomycete Schizophyllum commune | Print |

Jung Cover Picture: Eukaryotic Cell 9/2010Jung Cover Picture: Eukaryotic Cell 9/2010


The white rot fungus Schizophyllum commune reproduces via sexual spores only. Thus sexual development is targeted with the mating type loci encoding transcription factors and a pheromone receptor system of 7 transmembrane domain family receptors and their lipopeptide pheromone ligands. The receptors can distinguish between at least 20 different self and non-self pheromones. In response to a non-self pheromone, intracellular, Ras dependent signal transduction leads to induction of dynein dependent nuclear migration. Besides fruiting body development, cell growth and regulation Ras dependent regulation of genes of phosphatidylinositol pathway is investigated, for which a correlation with sexual development is assumed. Mutants of gene thn, originating from the activity of a transposable element and showing a disruption of pheromone receptor gene bbr2 or of RGS protein (regulator of G-protein signaling), are analyzed by mating interactions and the production of volatiles. In addition to sexual development the involvement of S. commune in weathering of Corg-rich rock and wooden material is studied, and the interaction with other fungi and bacteria is investigated. Furthermore lipid rafts should be identified in the fungal membrane, which are proposed to play an important role in the interaction with the environment. Since 2009 the sequenced genome of S. commune is available at www.jgi.doe.gov.
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Ectomycorrhizal fungi – specific gene expression, diversity and relationship with the environment | Print |
Krause Cover Picture: Journal of Basic Microbiology. 2/2016
Krause Cover Picture: Journal of Basic Microbiology. 2/2016

Colonization strategies and host specificity of ectomycorrhizal fungi are examined. Host and substrate specificity are investigated with fungi of the genus Tricholoma that are able to form a mutual symbiotic relationship with trees. The sequenced genome of Tricholoma vaccinum and Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation enable functional analyses. Using fingerprinting techniques genes specifically induced during establishing and functioning the symbiotic tissues could be detected, like an aldehyde dehydrogenase and a MATE transporter. Also hydrophobins, small, secreted proteins with a broad range of functions, including formation of aerial structures and mycorrhiza development, are in the focus of research.

Stress inducing conditions cause e.g. the induction of a retrotransposon, which might influence gene expression or genome evolution. In a further project the impact of other soil microorgansms like zygomycetes on the symbiosis of T. vaccinum and spruce (Picea abies), the production of phytohormones and volatiles are investigated.

The influence of mycorrhiza on the ecosystem forest is investigated in heavy metal contaminated habitats, including biodiversity of ectomycorrhiza and the occurrence of different exploration types in relationship with the environment pollution. Axenic co-culture experiments are performed to elucidate molecularbiological background of heavy metal response.
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Bioremediation using microorganisms | Print |
Streptomyceten
Streptomycetes

Streptomycetes from a heavy metal containing site of the former uranium mining site Wismut in Eastern Thuringia are used to determine the mechanisms of heavy metal resistance in this group of important soil microbes and questions of bio-geo-interactions. Investigation of superoxide dismutase and other factors of heavy metal binding capacity are investigated by biochemical and molecular techniques. In addition, different plants, with bacteria and/or AM fungi are used for pot and field experiments to develop bioremediation approaches. The monitoring of microbial biodiversity in disturbed ecosystems is included in these investigations which are part of a Geo-Bio-Interaction group in collaboration with other researchers of the university and Wismut GmbH/WISUTEC.

Another focus is the investigation of bacterial diversity of different habitats, also with regard on ist geological background, like humic-acid coated sands, salt springs of the Thuringian bassin or radionuklide-containing water from different mines.

Further the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using autochthonous microorganisms in contaminated gas plant areas is analysed, also focusing on the development of probable bioremediation approaches.
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